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Author Topic: Fifty bizarre words  (Read 914 times)
Alan W
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« on: April 27, 2019, 04:27:50 PM »

This blog post, 50 lost words from the OED is about a man who read the whole of the Oxford English Dictionary and wrote a book about it. It lists fifty of the strangest words he found, with their definitions. I thought it would appeal to some forumites. Which are your favourites?

I haven't checked whether any of these words are allowed in Chihuahua, but I would say probably not.
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Alan Walker
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2019, 06:01:31 PM »

Thank you Alan. This gave me more laughs than I've had in a while.

I particularly like:

cimicine
insordescent
jentacular
unbepissed  and
vulpeculated
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pat
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2019, 06:09:11 PM »

The man is obviously quite mad. As I was preparing to reply, blackrockrose sneaked in ahead of me. Two of my favourites are two of hers - unbepissed and vulpeculated, because theyíre both so ridiculous.

I also like psithurism, because I enjoy the sound of leaves being moved by the wind and I didnít know there was a word for it, and fard, because I have a puerile sense of humour.
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Leedscot
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2019, 06:30:56 PM »

Thanks Alan, Iíve bought the book after reading that blog. Look forward to reading it (much more than I would look forward to reading the entire OED). Agree with Pat re favourite words.

Jock
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Morbius
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2019, 06:51:55 PM »

constult (v.): to act stupidly together.

This is what 'constultants' do, isn't it?  We hire them and they advise us to act stupidly.  Then we pay them thousands of dollars.
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Valerie
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2019, 07:01:13 PM »

Wonderful stuff, Alan.  Thank you.  I can relate to quite a few.
aerumnous - yep, definitely a trouble-maker.
fard - oh yes.
obganiate - my partner calls it nagging!
residentarian - as a child when I was made to sit there until I'd eaten all my vegetables!
scringe - did that today when the temperature only reached the giddy heights of 12C.
All very happifying!
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anona
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« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2019, 07:52:16 PM »

Thank you, Alan. What fun!

I liked tacenda and heterophemize, because they're such useful words, and psithurism, because I use susurration and now know there's a more precise word if I can remember it!  Quag explains quagmire.

unbepissed: despite the author's incredulity, this might become a common word in our house. I jest, but there's some truth in it.  We have an outside cat who does his best to get into the house and wazz on as many things as he can before he's shooed out. His record is two walls and one leather settee in 7 minutes ( that we knew of).

There are maybe 8 - 10 words I might have made a reasonable stab at, but the only one I really knew was jentacular. Backfriend: I'd have guessed the opposite and said it was a good friend who watched your back for you.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2019, 08:11:45 PM by anona » Logged
mkenuk
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« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2019, 10:29:06 PM »

At least one of them has made it down to the COD - quag, meaning 'to shake'.
It's basically the same word as quake.
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TRex
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2019, 12:34:51 PM »

How in the world does one get vulpeculated??
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Katzmeow
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« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2019, 02:25:09 PM »

Thanks Alan.  So many quaint words in that list.

Personal favourites are;

happify - just because it's cute
grinagog - sounds like something from Harry Potter, but very apt for some people
impluvious  - I like the sound of it
occasionet - in the interests of more colourful, precise language.
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Hobbit
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2019, 05:57:24 PM »

Fab Alan Thanks.
I love happify Smiley & dactylodeiktous - here's pointing at you!
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Jacki
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« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2019, 10:04:51 AM »

Ammon Shea sounds like a very committed person. I wonder if he would get trophies every time he played Chihuahua or if he would be constantly challenging the rare and common words. He'd be pretty hard to argue against. It's amazing what your brain remembers.
When my children were little and I'd read to them or play learning games, I'd be amazed when a few days, weeks or even months later they would repeat back something I'd taught them.
I think that's one reason why when I'm trying to think of that elusive last word to reach a rosette, if I have a break (seems to be often when I'm in the shower) the word will pop into my mind, as if it's magically unlocked from the recesses of my memories.
Imagine what's sitting unlocked in Ammon's brain - and playing Scrabble with him!
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birdy
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« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2019, 02:34:30 AM »

advesperate (v.): to approach evening

Hmmm, "use a word three times and it is yours," to quote the old saying.

1. As the day advesperated, denizens of the crepuscular world emerged from their hiding places.

2. As the hour advesperates, the wage slaves leave their jobs and flood the subways.

3. The advesperating clouds glow with all the colors of the sunset.

Um, no.
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yelnats
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« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2019, 03:56:06 PM »

Quote
This blog post, 50 lost words from the OED is about a man who read the whole of the Oxford English Dictionary

I sat on the plane next to Amanda Vanstone (Oz ex-politician) from Canberra to Melbourne one afternoon and she was reading the Dictionary. Another day it was Brian Harradine (Tasmanian senator) who had the week's crosswords from the Mercury cut out. I helped him on one word from Friday's crossword for which he didn't have the answers.
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Valerie
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2019, 07:10:58 PM »

Yelnats.  Says it all!
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