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Author Topic: brekkie  (Read 587 times)
TRex
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~50 miles from Chicago, in the Corn (maize) Belt


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« on: April 20, 2019, 01:18:45 AM »

Playing around with the 7-by-many puzzle and tried playing brekkie. Shouldn't that be an acceptable word?
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mkenuk
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« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2019, 02:04:24 AM »

COD has both brekkie and brekky as Brit.,informal.

I think that means 'baby-talk'.

Not ashamed to say that I've used this word on many occasions, but I'm not sure how I would have spelled it!

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TRex
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2019, 02:55:36 AM »

I don't think informal means 'baby talk', but more like slang or colloquial use — something not normally found in formal writings or at a formal party, but might be used in fiction as part of a dialogue.
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mkenuk
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« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2019, 03:50:39 AM »

I don't think informal means 'baby talk', .

Not normally, but I meant in this particular case - it was a word I often used to my own kids when they were toddlers / infants.
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Hobbit
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« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2019, 05:22:33 AM »

I have to own up to saying brekkie!  When we're on holiday my friend & I always agree to "meet for brekkie at..." so I'm not the only one!
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Jacki
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« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2019, 06:59:47 AM »

I have to say that brekkie is well known is Australia, certainly commonly spoken. As to its spelling in my mind I come up with breakkie, but of course that looks so wrong. If I had to pick between brekkie and brekky I would go with brekkie.
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Ozzyjack
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Southern Highlands, NSW.


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« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2019, 08:12:03 AM »



Like a lot of expressions, I had mistakenly thought this was aussie-speak.   It looks like I was wrong and it is not only from our kiwi brothers that we pinch a lot of our supposedly Australianisms (and people if they are any good).

My two books on Australian slang/lingo by John Blackman and Janis M Lloyd spell it Brekkie but I don't care how it's spelt, I've just had mine and it was great, except I missed out on having googies. Cheesy
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Cheers, Jack



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anona
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« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2019, 03:33:52 PM »

Why is "biscuit" slang in Australia, please? (Particularly if it's the "correct term".) Do you usually call biscuits cookies, like the Americans?
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 03:35:30 PM by anona » Logged
yelnats
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« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2019, 03:47:28 PM »

Biscuit isn't slang, it's the proper term for what Americans call cookies. Bikkie is the abbreviation.
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whisky
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« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2019, 04:19:15 PM »

Reminds me of a 'funny' story.

We had a European teenage relative come and stay with us for 6 months.
Upon arrival at home, we sat down for a cuppa and a chat.

Our teenager asked "wanna bikkie?"
Our poor visitor who thought he had a good grasp of high school English, was totally perplexed.

For the non-Australians, the translation was 'would you like a biscuit?'
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Alan W
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Melbourne, Australia


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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2019, 04:08:57 PM »

The online Oxford lists brekkie, and gives brekky as an alternate spelling.

Going by the News on the Web corpus, brekkie is the more popular form, outnumbering brekky by 599 to 174 citations. Usage of the word, in either version, is much more frequent in the UK than in the US, but even more prevalent in Australia.

I'll add both, as rare words.
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